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20130803
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Aug 3, 2013 5:00am PDT
mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i
PBS
Aug 3, 2013 12:00am PDT
is by no means at the heart of all of the chapters. there is mississippi. there is one chapter about the pivotal year, 1964, freedom summer. bob moses. they are trying to outlaw segregation. dr. king is in jail in st. augustine, florida, and in that one summer, partisan politics turned upside down in the united states. the democrats went to the party of south segregation that they had been for a century. usurping states' rights and a sign of tyranny in the government. the first republicans popped up in the south, and the party of lincoln gave way to the party of presumptive white people, so it turned partisan politics on its head in one summer. between the far reaches of texas and the atlantic ocean in 1964, the very first ones came up. the chapter right in the middle shows how the power of race and the power of this movement really drove partisan politics in ways that people do not appreciate today. that is part of our misremembering. we do not want to remember how powerful a force race can be in our politics. tavis: this was really one of the greatest movements, but what does your
SFGTV2
Aug 3, 2013 3:30am PDT
actually the oldest merit system west of the mississippi and it was essentially created in response to mass fraud and corruption in city government. so, to give you a perspective. the commission's mission is to establish, ensure, maintain equitable and credible merit system for public service employment. the commission's goal is to consistently provide the best qualified candidates for public service in a timely and cost-effective manner. and i'd also like to point out our equal employment policy which permeates through all of our rules, it is the goal to provide fair treatment of applicants and aspects of employment without regard to membership of protected category and [speaker not understood]. that's essentially what merit system means. the civil service commission is a five-member commission poby and approved with veto authority by the board of supervisors. it is an independent commission by chart of the mayor prohibited from intervening in the civil service commission's matters. the civil service commission department staff itself, we are a small staff of six individuals. i've
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 8:00am EDT
, got on a barge that was going down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 12:00pm EDT
mississippi was not quite the life that mark twain for trade in his book. together the dangberg brothers went to work together in a flour mill and then they moved to illinois where they were, from for threeyein 1853 hearing on tt stories about the gold rush and california, they decided to make the move west. they did this by buying 200 head of livestock and driving them from st. louis to california. it turns out that could be a very profitable venture. because even back then things are more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or an ox for five or $10 in st. louis. same animal would cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada, in 1853, they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years, operating with mixed results. some days were exhausting, some is not so much. he did that for three winters. one of the letters that we recovered, he said that he gave up gold-mining because there was no water in the river in may of 1856. and
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 10:45am EDT
. trayvon martin has antecedence in the first black boy who was assassinated in mississippi in 1955 for allegedly violating racial adequate and speaking to a white woman. her body was placed in the tallahassee river with the 25 -- nugent. it was shown in jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our democracy. when you think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from a birmingham jail and in that letter dr. king said the activism going on in birmingham and the young women and men being arrested sometimes as young as 8, 9, 10 years old are taking this nation back to those great wells of democracy dug deep by the founding fathers. king was being kind because the country was founded on racial slavery. a conversation that we still have not had but 50 years ago with the march on washington provided, a litmus test for american democracy. when canes speaks at the march on washington on august 28, 1963, he says americans of all colors and all races are going to have to struggle together, go to jail tog
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 10:00am EDT
to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing what o
NBC
Aug 2, 2013 6:00pm PDT
festivals west of the mississippi. it's a can't-miss event. and the best part, it's absolutely free. so there's a lot of things happening out there. a lot of different venues. over 700 booths you can visit. but the gourmet marketplace, that's denise with whole foods, this looks amazing. what is whole foods going to be doing? >> whole foods is going to be demoing every how on the hour. this is just a small sampling of some of the great food we're going to have. >> we're going to have great fried foods, but this is eye opening folks how easy it is to koom healthy. >> it is. and today we're going to make a very simple salad. four basic ingredients. >> i can do that. so let's go ahead and get to it. >> what is it called. >> it's a massage kale salad. all we're going to do is add one avocado. >> delicious. all local produce? >> all local produce. the juice of one lemon, some onions, a little pinch of salt, pepper. now the fun begins. >> the massage? >> we're going to massage the heck out of it. >> you're getting right in there. >> absolutely. my favorite tool in the kitchen are my hands.
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 2:00pm EDT
supposed to have one. it is problematic in some seo --mississippi, in some oun -- some states and counties, there may only be one. there are multistate plans, which we haven't mentioned before. the people who designed the law and who wrote it foresaw the chance that in some parts of the country there might not be sufficient competition. there are provisions to have at least one nonprofit of the state plan and one for-profit of the state plan. they are still being implemented now. they are not likely to be rolled out on a national basis, as was the original intention. --t there are other backstops they are another backstop intended to bring in more competition into states that may be lacking them. another is the co-ops. the federal government, the law provided large subsidies to set up brand-new insurance companies in some states. typically these are blue states like maryland, california -- guest: they were stopped midstride. they got defunded. guest: so it won't be in every state. but the point is that there may be limits to competition and that is something that is going to have
MSNBC
Aug 3, 2013 9:00am PDT
heavier rain and because of that we have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they're getting better and subsiding. we're seeing this heavier rain off the coast of florida. while it's helping to fuel some thunderstorms the threat exactly from tropical depression dorian is becoming less of an issue as it will take this turn northeast. it will move out to sea north of bermuda. temperature wise 102 in dallas. 76 in chicago. tomorrow looks even cooler. temps in the new england area should only be in the mid-70s with late day thunderstorms. the showers that we're seeing in the northeast won't last all that much longer. we could squeeze out sunshine. most of next week temperatures look nice and comfortable. nothing too hot and nothing too cool in the northeast. >> that sounds like tend of a goldilocks story. >>> i talk to a leading crime fighter on the unintended consequences of stop and frisk policies. >>> the woman who accuses the san diego mayor of harassment. okay, a? b? b. a? that's a great choice. let me show you some faucets to go along with that. with
NBC
Aug 3, 2013 5:00am PDT
arkansas. we have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river. they stretch west back towards wichita where a flood watch is in effect. the heavy rain is coming down in buckets. we had severe thunderstorm watches this morning. we are seeing the heavy rain now pushing into northwestern arkansas. we have frequent cloud to ground lightning and torrential downs. we'll keep an eye out for flooding for the next several hours. the showers in the northeast brought on by the cold front. clouds with spotty showers. the best chance of stronger storms besides areas in missouri and arkansas will be in eastern colo . >>> we see temperatures around the bay area in the 50s with low clouds and drizzle and mist around san francisco. notice the winds. very strongly onshore and in the north bay. the all day sea breeze. temperatures mostly in the 60s from san francisco to oakland and 70s and 80s south of downtown san jose and low 80s in the trivalley. the trend will continue into monday with a slightly stronger sea breeze that means more cooling early next week. >>> that's your latest
MSNBC
Aug 3, 2013 5:00am PDT
. everything has a tradition. this one in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an ea
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 7:00am EDT
already biled built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)